Knowledge is power and power lies in connectivity…

In a world where connectivity is power, it is easy to see how political and social movements have gathered momentum and manifested into significant revolutions. Connectivity has defined the role of social media as a means by which people can mobilise, coordinate and disseminate information. Social Media has become a podium for the individual from which they use their voice to amplify a message that has the potential to insight change.

For example, #blacklivesmatter was a movement that started after George Simmerman’s acquittal for the shooting death of Trayvon Martin in 2012. This movement is about starting the conversation around state violence in the US and still continues today.

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Who knew facebook statuses, tweets and YouTube clips could cause such a big reaction for the people?

So, the power now lies with the individual but is dependent upon connectivity. People are empowered by their own participation in social media and this is how political and social movements are started. The world is changing. My question to you is, are these changes for the better?

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6 Replies to “Knowledge is power and power lies in connectivity…”

  1. It is truly fascinating how tweets, videos and posts on Facebook can mobilise such movements and create such an uproar from such a small piece of content. The notion that connectivity allows us to convey our opinions and attitudes on different political, racial and social stand points is completely true. You were right in saying that the Black Lives Matter movement is a movement which is transcending space and time in regards to the speed at which adherents came to peoples aid online and in a physical space. However, have you heard about All Lives Matter? It is also a notion that supports all lives instead of only black lives, that everyone should be treated as equal and that Black people should not have this hashtag online. There are so many things wrong with this (some here for further reading: http://www.relevantmagazine.com/current/nation/problem-saying-all-lives-matter), but still people support it as it is what they believe. How are they able to do this? Through the connectivity social media and the internet allows us. Coordinate protests and conferences with this technology, wether social media therefore facilitates revolutions is a question I will leave up to you. Does it cause revolutions? (http://motherboard.vice.com/read/twitter-makes-it-easy-to-start-a-revolution-without-finishing-it)

    ~ krisesanchrosses ~

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  2. You brought up great points in your blog post, well done! Your point on empowerment is interesting because joining in the conversation provides a certain power to the movement and to the individual–this is because having a voice online is addictive. To improve your post you could talk about how the hashtag has impacted the world, because it is a pretty big topic at the moment. Take a look at this article to see the impact of this hashtag: http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/12/black-lives-matter/421839/ To answer your question, I believe these changes are for the better, its connecting our world and opening our eyes to the brutality and unfairness that is within our world. Without these platforms, we wouldn’t be able to witness for ourselves the police brutality against coloured people or the impact of the Syrian war on children. It stirs up a response–not just from the citizens of the country that its happening in, but citizens of the world who join in to support and raise awareness from the other side of the world. This article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pierre-omidyar/social-media-enemy-of-the_b_4867421.html also details in the implications that social media has had on the ‘powerful.’ To many people of power and status social media is scary, and it should be! It’s now a microphone for citizens to finally raise their voice and organise to do something against injustice. Now that we have a universal and amplified voice, we as citizens will never stop using it.

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  3. Great example of a movement that uses social media. This article delves into this matter further https://www.wired.com/2015/10/how-black-lives-matter-uses-social-media-to-fight-the-power/. A few sources could have improved your post further. I think that the Black Lives Matter is a particularly interesting movement at it is ongoing and has been for quite a few years now with so many protests that have occurred since, I find it surprising that not as much has been done about the issue.

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  4. Its quiet incredible how much reach a singular post can attract through the use of a hashtag. Our social platforms have become a base for cries of help in times of need – its amazing how we band together online as a community to try make a change. In answering your questions – Yes these changes are for the better. In building social campaigns online pressure is created for political parties to make a change in order to cater to the social expectations of what is deemed ethically correct. An example of a successful campaign which has created change. These top tweets are examples of how the world shifted together through the use of a hashtag https://twitter.com/i/moments/711697851227574272

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  5. great point it is incredible how twitter and facebook or any other social media can empowered the movement. i agree with your point that social media is not the main reason of the movement but it audience it self, they the one who creating the movement. I reckon few more example like video and sources would be good as I never heard this movement till now when i read your post.

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  6. I think everything in moderation. Dont just rely on news outlets for these breaking new stories and don’t count on the public to tweet all truths when its happening. The media often try and bend the truth to their advantage and the public can definitely exaggerate. Having a healthy dosage of both will definitely give you the most accurate information, and remember fact checking is key!

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